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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

1 edition of Lincoln and the Constitution found in the catalog.

Lincoln and the Constitution

Mark E. Neely

Lincoln and the Constitution

bulletin of the 39th annual meeting of the Lincoln Fellowship of Wisconsin, held at Madison, Wisconsin, April 18, 1982

by Mark E. Neely

  • 127 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by The Fellowship in Madison, Wis .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865 -- Views on the Constitution.,
    • United States.,
    • United States -- History -- Civil War, 1861-1865 -- Law and legislation.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statementby Mark E. Neely, Jr.
      SeriesHistorical bulletin / The Lincoln Fellowship of Wisconsin ;, no. 38, Historical bulletin (Lincoln Fellowship of Wisconsin) ;, no. 38.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsE457.2 .N47 1983
      The Physical Object
      Pagination16 p. :
      Number of Pages16
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3254252M
      LC Control Number83172578

        For example, in his recent book, The Constitution: An Introduction, Michael Paulsen prominently features this reading of Lincoln’s actions: “Most dramatically of all, Lincoln had defied a Author: Randy Barnett. Lincoln and the Triumph of the Nation: Constitutional Conflict in the American Civil War, by Mark E. Neely Jr. (North Carolina, pp., $35) I n early February , President-elect Abraham Author: Fred Schwarz.

        Grounding Lincoln's constitutionalism in his reading habits and early legal career, Dirck masterfully balances biographical details, Lincoln's value system, the opinions of his supporters and critics, and key events and ideas to show how his thinking about the U.S. Constitution changed over time. From Lincoln's deep reverence for the work of Author: Ann Long.   Abraham Lincoln as constitutional radical: The 13th amendment J by Abigail Perkiss In recent weeks, Americans have looked on as the nation’s highest court has handed down decisions seeking to reconcile fundamental questions about the scope of the U.S. Constitution.

      Abraham Lincoln (/ ˈ l ɪ ŋ k ən /; Febru – Ap ) was an American statesman and lawyer who served as the 16th president of the United States (–). Lincoln led the nation through its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis in the American Civil preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the Born: Febru , Sinking Spring Farm, . With the brief words, “I, Abraham Lincoln, do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the Office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my Ability, preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States” Lincoln was sworn in as the sixteenth president.


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Lincoln and the Constitution by Mark E. Neely Download PDF EPUB FB2

More than a straightforward overview of Lincoln’s constitutional views, Lincoln and the Constitution provides a starting point for further inquiry into interpretations and defenses as well as the political, intellectual, and cultural traditions of the founding document of the United by: 4.

Lincoln's Constitution and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - Cited by:   Lincoln used his conception of presidential war powers to advance the twin causes of Union and emancipation, and Dirck explores the constitutional problems stirred by curbs Lincoln placed on civil liberties, internal security, and freedom of expression during :   More than a straightforward overview of Lincoln’s constitutional views, Lincoln and the Constitution provides a starting point for further inquiry into interpretations and defenses as well as the political, intellectual, and cultural traditions of the founding document of the United States/5.

Daniel Farber's Lincoln's Constitution is both informative and insightful. The book wrestles with the constitutional issues raised by secession and the Civil War/5.

Lincoln used his conception of presidential war powers to advance the twin causes of Union and emancipation, and Dirck explores the constitutional problems stirred by curbs Lincoln placed on civil liberties, internal security, and freedom of expression during by: 4.

Brian R. Dirck is a professor of history at Anderson University in Indiana. He is the author of numerous articles and books on Abraham Lincoln, including Lincoln and Davis: Imagining America, ;Lincoln the Lawyer;Abraham Lincoln and White America;Lincoln and the Constitution; and Lincoln in Indiana.

show more/5(12). Brian Dirck’s Lincoln and the Constitution is a highly readable study of Abraham Lincoln’s thoughts and actions concerning the U.S. Constitution. Dirck combines extensive primary research and thoughtful, accessible consideration of Lincoln’s views to reveal new insights into Lincoln’s impact on the U.S.

Constitution. Lincoln and the Constitution is a rich, creative, and utterly readable rendering of the development of Abraham Lincoln’s constitutional theory from which scholars, too, can benefit.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading Lincoln and the Constitution, and I learned a great deal from it. Lincoln and the Constitution: the dictatorship question reconsidered Volume 7 of Annual R. Gerald McMurtry lecture: Author: Herman Belz: Publisher: Louis A.

Warren Lincoln Library and Museum, Length: 31 pages: Subjects. Teaching the Constitution at War I think the constitution invests its commander-in-chief, with the law of war, in time of war.

Abraham Lincoln, Aug By Matthew Pinsker. Abraham Lincoln has long been The Great Example in American history and never more so than whenever presidents claim sweeping war powers in the name of national.

Anyone who reads his accessible, vivid, even entertaining book will understand why Abraham Lincoln cannot be ignored in any account of the constitutional history of the United States."--Mark E. Neely, McCabe-Grier Professor of the History of the Civil War Era at Penn State University "Events of the past decade have sent pundits, politicians, and policy makers in search of Abraham Lincoln's Constitution.

In Lincoln's Constitution, Farber offers a concise synthesis of the pertinent history, extended discussion of Lincoln's reasons for his actions, and elegant analysis of the relevant issues. For these reasons alone, the book is worth reading.

Abraham Lincoln and a New Birth of Freedom: The Union and Slavery in the Diplomacy of the Civil War. University of Nebraska Press, Klingaman, William K. Abraham Lincoln and the Road to Emancipation.

Reissue edition, Penguin USA, Lincoln, Abraham. In his book, The Constitution in Exile, Napolitano details the story of Abraham Lincoln’s assault on the writ of habeas corpus and his persecution of one of his chief critics during the war. In Lincoln's Constitution Daniel Farber leads the reader to understand exactly how Abraham Lincoln faced the inevitable constitutional issues brought on by the Civil War.

Examining what arguments Lincoln made in defense of his actions and how his words and deeds fit into the context of the times, Farber illuminates Lincoln's actions by placing them squarely within their historical moment.4/5(1).

Buy Lincoln and the Constitution (Concise Lincoln Library) by Brian Dirck (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Brian Dirck. Lincoln and Freedom. by Lewis E. Lehrman “I have always thought that all men should be free; but if any should be slaves it should be first those who desire it for themselves, and secondly, those who desire it for er [I] hear any one arguing for slavery I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally,” President Lincoln told an Indiana Regiment passing through.

Ceremonial copy of the proposed Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, signed by Abraham Lincoln and all members of Congress who voted for the joint resolution The United States Senate had passed a joint resolution on April 8,calling for an amendment to the Constitution that ended slavery, but the House of Representatives had.

In Lincoln's view, the Constitution was an imperfect and always evolving document. And it had, in its original form, established the legality of slavery. By invoking the earlier document, the Declaration of Independence, Lincoln was able to make his argument about equality, and the purpose of the war being a "new birth of freedom.".

In Lincoln's Constitution Daniel Farber leads the reader to understand exactly how Abraham Lincoln faced the inevitable constitutional issues brought on by the Civil War.Much worse, DiLorenzo says, Lincoln started a war that killedsouls, not to free slaves or save the Union, but to hold on to the tariff revenue of the seceding Southern states - which provided 95 percent of the federal budget.

Contrary to the design of the U.S. Constitution, Lincoln wanted a strong central government, not a voluntary confederation of sovereign states.Mary Jane Woodger, “Abraham Lincoln and the Mormons,” in Civil War Saints, ed.

Kenneth L. Alford (Provo, UT: Religious Studies Center; Salt Lake City: Deseret Book, ), 61– Mary Jane Woodger is a professor of Church history and doctrine at Brigham Young University.